The newsLINK Group - Texting and Berylium

Editorial Library Category: Mining Topics: Mining, Texting Title: Texting: 2day’s Quick & EZ Way 2 Communicate Author: newsLINK Staff Synopsis: In June 2010, about 293 million people had a cell-phone in the U.S. Divide that number by 313 million people, which is a little less than the total number of people now living in the U.S., and you get a surprising percentage: more than 93 percent of the people in this country have a cell phone. Editorial: Texting: 2day’s Quick & EZ Way 2 Communicate 4064 South Highland Drive, Millcreek, Utah 84124 │ thenewslinkgroup.com │ (v) 801.676.9722 │ (tf) 855.747.4003 │ (f) 801.742.5803 Editorial Library | © The newsLINK Group LLC 1 In June 2010, about 293 million people had a cell-phone in the U.S. Divide that number by 313 million people, which is a little less than the total number of people now living in the U.S., and you get a surprising percentage: more than 93 percent of the people in this country have a cell phone. That might even include you, because even children who are still in grade school are getting cell phones at younger and younger ages. If you have a cell phone, then you probably use it to send text messages; most people do. About 73 percent of people with cell phones send text messages, but the percentage is higher for people who are younger. The average number of text messages someone gets in a day is 41.5 messages. The median user sends or gets about ten. (If you don’t remember what the median is, you put a group of numbers in order, and the one in the middle is the median. If there are two numbers in the middle, then the median is the average of those two numbers.) Texting has even become a basic part of major sporting events such as the Super Bowl. AT&T reported that during Super Bowl 46 in 2012, 722,296 text messages were sent or received. Nobody knows yet how many text messages were sent annually in 2012, but for 2011, experts thought people sent about seven trillion messages. The Origins of Text Messaging For something that is considered to be the fastest and most reliable way of communicating in our world today, texting hasn’t been around for very long. Since then, of course, text messages have become a huge part of having a cell phone. While many of the world’s younger “texters” have always lived in a texting world, most adults remember life without communication constantly at their fingertips. The first text message ever sent was sent December 3, 1992 by a 22-year-old test engineer to his boss. It was a message that would be very typical among texts today: “Merry Christmas.” It marked a permanent change in the way the world communicates. The following years saw a slow growth in text message use, with customers sending an average of only 0.4 messages per month in 1995. Although young people are more likely to send text messages than people who are middle-aged or older, even someone who thinks the new technology is hard is still likely to send more messages than that in a week. After 2005, the number of text messages being sent started to get even bigger. In 2008, for the first time, the number of text messages being sent was bigger than the number of cell calls being made. Americans today still are more likely to send text messages than to talk on their phones. Beryllium When cell phones were originally invented, they were big and clunky. Holding one wasn’t that different than trying to pick up a brick and talk into it. But our culture loves thin, light cell phones, tablets, and laptops. The big goal seems to be taking something thin and light, and then making it even smaller. Beryllium, a silver-grey metal and the fourth element on the periodic table, is the miracle-metal that makes it possible. Most of us don’t think much about beryllium, but if you have a cell phone, then you carry beryllium around in your pocket or your purse every day — because cell phones use it. The battery contacts, electronic connectors and other metal pieces are made using copper beryllium alloys. Beryllium conducts electricity and can handle heat, which makes it possible for engineers to make small, dense parts. Beryllium is two-thirds the density of aluminum, making it one of the lightest metals around. What’s more, it lasts, resists corrosion when things get hot, is not magnetic, and has a “spring memory” that prevents electrical disconnections and stops the beryllium from shattering or breaking even when it is being used all the time, gets shaken, and gets dropped.

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