The newsLINK Group - Mining's Contribution to Electronics

Editorial Library Category: Mining Topics: Mining, Electronics Title: Mining’s Contribution to Electronics Author: newsLINK Staff Synopsis: People in the U.S. today tend to take electronic equipment such as computers for granted. When you walk into a store that sells electronics, after all, chances are that what you see is going to be sleek, thin, have some impressive numbers associated to tell you how fast and powerful it is, and look nothing like the materials that were mined in order to construct it. Editorial: Mining’s Contribution to Electronics 4064 South Highland Drive, Millcreek, Utah 84124 │ thenewslinkgroup.com │ (v) 801.676.9722 │ (tf) 855.747.4003 │ (f) 801.742.5803 Editorial Library | © The newsLINK Group LLC 1 People in the U.S. today tend to take electronic equipment such as computers for granted. When you walk into a store that sells electronics, after all, chances are that what you see is going to be sleek, thin, have some impressive numbers associated to tell you how fast and powerful it is, and look nothing like the materials that were mined in order to construct it. How much do we take our modern toys for granted? If you are like most people, you probably don’t realize how big a part of your life they have become. When you consider the matter, however, there are many Internet “firsts” that would simply have been impossible without computers, tablets, lap tops, and smart phones: Ray Tomlinson sent, and received, the first email in 1971. The U.S. Department of Defense sponsored and built a large network of computers that it called the ARPANET (Advanced Research Projects Agency Network). Those who put it together connected the computers first, but didn’t know what to do with them once that was done, so they started looking around for possible applications. A man named Richard W. Watson created a Mail Box Protocol that was never implemented. Ray Tomlinson, who worked at a company called BBN Technologies (now called Raytheon BBN Technologies), was aware of a program called SNDMSG that had been around since about 1961. He combined the functionality of SNDMSG and another program, called CPYNET; by doing this, he made the first email program. If you are young enough, it’s possible you may never even have known a time when you couldn’t send an email message. Gary Thuerk, who was working as a marketer for Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) sent the first spam email in 1978. The message was about open houses where people could come see computers. Enough people paid attention to the message to justify sending it, and an entirely new part of marketing was born. The first portable computer, the Osborne 1, was released in 1981. Symbolics.com was the first registered domain name in 1985. The first website dates back to 1991 and had information about the worldwide web. The first laptop in a notebook style was released in 1989. It was the NEC UltraLite. Tim Berners-Lee, a British computer scientist, uploaded the first picture to the Internet in 1992. He got the image from an IT developer named Silvano de Gennaro. The photo is of four women who just happened to be some lab employees at CERN, which is a research laboratory located in Geneva, but they don’t look like lab employees in the photo. These women had formed a parody band (Les Horribles Cernettes) and the picture had been photoshopped for their next CD cover. When the photo was uploaded, nobody realized they were making history. Ted Leonsis sent the first AOL instant message to his wife in 1993. Joe McCambley ran the first online banner ad in 1994 on HotWired.com. The first thing ever sold on eBay (called AuctionWeb at the time), in 1995, was a $14.83 broken laser point. Amazon began selling online books in 1995. The first one sold was written by Douglas Hofstadter; suitably enough, the title was a technical one: Fluid Concepts and Creative Analogies: Computer Models of the Fundamental Mechanisms of Thought. Although Microsoft did try to create some tablets in the early 2000s, they didn’t go much of anywhere. It wasn’t until Apple introduced the iPad, with an impressive advertising campaign early in 2010, that the tablet took off. Mark Zuckerberg was the first person on Facebook, which he created early in 2004. The first person to join Facebook who wasn’t a founder is named Arie Hasit.

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