The newsLINK Group - Concrete

Editorial Library Category: Mining Topics: Concrete Title: Concrete Author: newsLINK Staff Synopsis: Concrete is one of the oldest mining products in existence. The first real concrete had to wait until about 300 B.C., when it was first put to work by the Romans. However, you can trace the events leading to its development much further back than that. Editorial: Concrete 4064 South Highland Drive, Millcreek, Utah 84124 │ thenewslinkgroup.com │ (v) 801.676.9722 │ (tf) 855.747.4003 │ (f) 801.742.5803 Editorial Library | © The newsLINK Group LLC 1 Concrete is one of the oldest mining products in existence. The first real concrete had to wait until about 300 B.C., when it was first put to work by the Romans. However, you can trace the events leading to its development much further back than that. For example, Egyptians mixed mud and straw to create dried bricks in 3000 B.C., and made a mortar combining lime and gypsum for use in building the Pyramids. About the same time, Chinese people combined materials that had the same characteristics as cement with bamboo. Chinese people then used the combination to build the Great Wall and also their boats. As a result of its age, you might not think about concrete as an innovative building material, but recent advances are proving that its story is still an open-ended one. Below, some of the most intriguing new twists on an ancient technology: Aridus Rapid Drying Concrete What do you do when a customer wants to cut the building schedule from 14 months to four months? That was the challenge handed to contractors for a replacement school in the Dallas Independent School District called the Billy Early Dade Middle School. The school needed to be student-ready by the beginning of the school year in 2013. The project involved 120,000 square feet of floors and used 20,000 cubic yards of concrete. Concrete drying time alone on a regular schedule would have filled the full four-month period. That would not have worked. By opting to use 5,000 cubic yards of Aridus Rapid Drying Concrete instead for part of the work to be done, final flooring went in 21 days after the concrete had been poured. The contractors chose Aridus Rapid Drying Concrete because it is a ready mix that has been designed to prevent flooring failures caused by moisture. Not only does it dry fast, it also has low permeability, high early strength, and compressive strength. BoralPure Smog-eating Tile Popular Mechanics gave BoralPure Smog-eating Tile an award for being a breakthrough product. The tiles remove nitrogen oxides (which have been emitted from conventional cars) out of the surrounding air. How does the process work? The tiles have a photocatalyst in them of titanium dioxide. The titanium dioxide oxidizes the nitrogen oxides and leaves behind a benign precipitate that then washes away in the next rainstorm. As if it needed to do more, the tiles also: Use UV light to break down organic substances, such as mold and algae, that can sometimes grow on roofs. Provide high thermal mass, emissivity, and reflectivity. Create a pocket of air insulation between the tile and the roof deck. Can be recycled in new buildings or used to build roads. Green Sense Optimization Service If you want to talk about a high-profile building project that was as big on symbolizing strength and freedom as it was on technical difficulty, the 1776-foot skyscraper named One World Trade Center has got to fit the profile. The Port Authority of New York/New Jersey made the project even more challenging when it decided that much of the Portland cement to be used had to be replaced by recycled materials. BASF Construction Chemicals offers a Green Sense optimization service that helped with the project’s many requirements. If you haven’t heard of BASF Construction Chemicals, it’s a 150-year-old company that is mindful of today’s emphasis on environmental responsibility and life-cycle durability by using chemistry to reduce the energy and resources that construction typically requires. (The company’s website makes the focus clear with its motto: “We create chemistry.”) In the case of One World Trade Center, 71 percent of the Portland cement that would have been used was replaced with specialized admixtures, non-cementitious fibers, and recycled materials. For example, the 38,000 cubic yards of special mix used to build the first 40 floors had to have a compressive strength of at least 12,000 psi. The results

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