The newsLINK Group - Summer's Deadliest Days

Editorial Library Category: Legal | Personal Injury Topics: Accidents Title: Summer’s Deadliest Days Author: newsLINK Staff Synopsis: Did you know that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have identified accidents such as car crashes as the leading cause of death for drivers between the ages of 15 and 19? That makes accidents a more likely cause of death for these young adults than homicide or suicide. Editorial: Summer’s Deadliest Days 4064 South Highland Drive, Millcreek, Utah 84124 │ thenewslinkgroup.com │ (v) 801.676.9722 │ (tf) 855.747.4003 │ (f) 801.742.5803 Editorial Library | © The newsLINK Group LLC 1 Did you know that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have identified accidents such as car crashes as the leading cause of death for drivers between the ages of 15 and 19? That makes accidents a more likely cause of death for these young adults than homicide or suicide. Not only that, but teens are more likely to crash than any other age group. Crashes put their own lives at risk, but can also potentially harm other passengers, pedestrians, and the people in other cars. There are ten days each year when young people are at increased risk, historically, for getting in a car accident: July 2nd, 3rd, and 4th August 3rd, 4th, 6th, and 12th September 2nd December 23rd January 1st Of the ten days, eight of them take place between Memorial Day and Labor Day, which makes that period of approximately 100 days a particularly dangerous one. The deadliest driving month is August; the deadliest day of the week is Saturday; and the deadliest period during the day is between 3 p.m. and 6 p.m. Why is it that teens are more likely to be hurt or killed during these periods? Some of it is a matter of opportunity. Most young people are out of school during the summer, and many of them use that time as an opportunity to drive somewhere fun with their friends. Teens are inexperienced. They tend to downplay dangers such as having too many passengers in the car, driving after drinking alcohol or taking drugs, and texting while driving. If something bad happens, such as a tire suddenly blowing, teens may not know how to safely deal with the problem without causing an accident or making things worse. How can you prevent accidents in your family? Practice with your family’s young drivers. Just because someone passed a class and has been given a license does not mean that person is ready for unlimited car freedom. For one or two years after your teen gets a license, continue to monitor your teen’s driving skills. Agree to guidelines and expectations before you let your teen children take the car. You might even want to make the guidelines and expectations formal by writing them down and requiring a signature. Have a family-wide rule about not texting or emailing while driving, even at stop lights. This is not just for teens; it applies to adults as well. You can’t expect your teens to put cell phones away for the duration of a drive if you can’t manage that kind of discipline yourself. Talk to your teens about alcohol and drugs. Teens need to understand that even if alcohol and drugs are strictly taboo, you’d rather know about it, and give your teen a safe ride home, than have that same teen drive while impaired. Most of all, encourage teens to be careful, set a good example, and give them the support they need while they are acquiring driving skills and experience. Sources: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/fastats/adolescent-health.htm http://www.safemotorist.com/articles/deadliest_days_on_th e_road.aspx http://creativesafetypublishing.com/100-deadliest-days-on- the-road/ http://wesavelives.org/100-deadliest-days-summer/ Word Count: 499 Copyscape Clear Date: 06.23.2015

RkJQdWJsaXNoZXIy NjAyOTE=