The newsLINK Group - How to Go Green - Cleaning

Editorial Library Category: Health Topics: Green Cleaning Title: How to Go Green: Cleaning Author: newsLINK Staff Synopsis: Our homes and offices are filled with cleaning products: the dishes you eat from, the countertops where you prepare your food, your floors, and many other places. But in our war on dirt and germs, we may often actually be making things worse. Editorial: How to Go Green: Cleaning 4064 South Highland Drive, Millcreek, Utah 84124 │ thenewslinkgroup.com │ (v) 801.676.9722 │ (tf) 855.747.4003 │ (f) 801.742.5803 Editorial Library | © The newsLINK Group LLC 1 Cleaning Effectively Our homes and offices are filled with cleaning products: the dishes you eat from, the countertops where you prepare food, your floors, and many other places. But in our war on dirt and germs, we may often actually be making things worse. This is true because most conventional cleaning products are petroleum-based. Using them has serious implications for your health and the environment. The commercial products people use to clean are effective in the sense that they are powerful, but sometimes the reason they are effective is directly tied to the fact that they are toxic. A person who suffers from allergies or other health problems is at particularly high risk, even from ingredients that are as seemingly harmless as perfume. At the same time, though, healthy people can develop problems over time too as they continually use some of these chemical cocktails to clean their homes. The warning labels we’ve all seen just tell you the most immediate harm that can come from using a product; they don’t tell you what will happen if you use that product over several decades. And don’t forget that adults are not the only ones at risk from conventional cleaners: every year, household products poison between five and ten million people… mostly children. Safe, Time-Tested Alternatives Instead of buying cleaning products that are powerful but toxic, you can try the old-fashioned, time-tested methods of the past. You may want to start small and just try one or two new ways of cleaning. Over time, as you gain experience and knowledge, you can expand your experiments with using inexpensive, safe ingredients to clean house. Let’s look at just two: vinegar (which is a mild acid) and baking soda (which is alkaline). If you are planning to clean with vinegar, choose white. It’s cheap and it won’t stain surfaces. (If you want to buy organic products, try cider vinegar. It is more likely to be produced organically. But you’ll pay more money, and it won’t work any better than white vinegar.) Use vinegar to polish surfaces, remove grease, and get rid of bad smells. Do not mix vinegar and bleach! Combining them makes toxic fumes. Baking soda is great for cleaning and deodorizing. Use it to clean grout, make a refrigerator smell better, or clean a sink. It can also be used to safely clean metal, and it’s gentle enough to use when you clean your teeth (it’s one of the ingredients in many toothpastes you can buy in the store). If you apply it to a sting, it can relieve the pain. Sources: “How to Go Green: Cleaning,” Word document from Sophie, no date or name. “Use Natural Household Cleaners for a Greener, Safer Home,” http://www.greenfootsteps.com/natural-household- cleaners.html http://www.infinitehealthresources.com/Store/Resource/Arti cle/85/1/1002.html Word Count: 433 Copyscape Clear Date: 12.16.2014

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