The newsLINK Group - Smoking and Periodontal Disease

Editorial Library Category: General Business | Dental | Periodontist – Gum Disease Topics: Periodontal Disease, Smoking Title: Smoking and Periodontal Disease Author: newsLINK Staff Synopsis: Recent studies have shown that tobacco use may be one of the most significant risk factors in the development and progression of periodontal disease. Editorial: Smoking and Periodontal Disease 4064 South Highland Drive, Millcreek, Utah 84124 │ thenewslinkgroup.com │ (v) 801.676.9722 │ (tf) 855.747.4003 │ (f) 801.742.5803 Editorial Library | © The newsLINK Group LLC 1 Recent studies have shown that tobacco use may be one of the most significant risk factors in the development and progression of periodontal disease. In addition, following periodontal treatment or any type of oral surgery, the chemicals in tobacco can slow down the healing process and make the treatment results less predictable. Researches also have found that the following problems occur more often in people who use tobacco products: oral cancer, bad breath, stained teeth, tooth loss, bone loss, loss of taste, less success with dental implants, gum recession and mouth sores. Smoking extends a favorable habitat for bacteria such as P. gingivalis, P. intermedia, and A.actinomycetemcomitans to shallow sites. Molecular byproducts of smoking interfere with mechanisms that normally contain growth of damaging bacteria at the surface of the oral mucosa in gingival crevices. Clearly the effect of smoking as it relates to oral healthcare is significant and alarming to dental professionals. As health care providers, it is our responsibility to communicate these findings to our patients, but at the same time, it is not our responsibility to actually counsel our patients. We have found that a useful tool in communication the need to quit tobacco usage is the 5As: ask, advise, assess, assist and arrange: 1. Ask – for example “Do you smoke?” 2. Advise –for example “Quitting smoking will enable us to treat your gum disease more effectively.” Be firm and positive, but not condemning or judgmental. 3. Assess – Some patients are not even contemplating, some will be thinking of it, others ready to quit now. Your patient’s responses will guide you in your assessment. 4. Assist – Give them advice to help them make the change. You can recommend they visit the doctor, call a quit line or see their pharmacist for over-the-counter nicotine cessation products. 5. Arrange – If appropriate, you can help them to arrange an appointment with someone who can help them further. Sources: Word Count: 320 Copyscape Clear Date: 04.28.2012

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