The newsLINK Group - Gum Disease Isn't Just for Old People

Editorial Library Category: General Business | Dental | Periodontist – Gum Disease Topics: Gum Disease Title: Gum Disease Isn’t Just for Old People Author: newsLINK Staff Synopsis: When people think about gum disease, many of them think gum disease is something that only affects old people. After all, people are much likelier to have gum disease if they are over the age of 35 than they are if they are younger than that. Editorial: Gum Disease Isn’t Just for Old People 4064 South Highland Drive, Millcreek, Utah 84124 │ thenewslinkgroup.com │ (v) 801.676.9722 │ (tf) 855.747.4003 │ (f) 801.742.5803 Editorial Library | © The newsLINK Group LLC 1 When people think about gum disease, many of them think gum disease is something that only affects old people. After all, people are much likelier to have gum disease if they are over the age of 35 than they are if they are younger than that. But no matter what your age is, you might be just as much at risk as someone who is older. You might get gum disease because of your genetic background, because you don’t take good care of your teeth, and because of lifestyle choices you’ve made. No matter what the reason is, however, the consequences are serious ones. Gum disease, which is also known as periodontal disease, is a bacterial infection in your mouth. It starts out as something called gingivitis. In the short term, the most obvious consequence may just be extremely bad breath … which is difficult or impossible to mask, and definitely not something that anyone really wants. But it doesn’t stop there. Although gingivitis can usually be cured without too much of a problem, sometimes people don’t pay attention to it, and before they know it, their gingivitis has progressed to a full-on case of periodontal disease. Probably the most important consequence for getting periodontal disease is eventually losing one or more of your teeth. Not only does this affect your appearance, it also affects your ability to eat nutritious food. How can you be healthy if you can’t eat right? That alone can affect every aspect of your health and well-being. Treatment can be expensive, too, since you may have already lost your teeth if you’ve ignored the problem for too long; at that point, the best solution — getting one or more tooth implants — involves surgery and may not be covered by insurance. If you develop gum disease because of genetics, that’s not really your fault. But even then, you can still exercise some control over the situation. Someone who is careful about getting regular checkups, brushing gently but thoroughly, flossing, and using mouthwash on a regular (and frequent) basis is always going to be ahead of someone who neglects doing those things. And for most people, genetics don’t have anything to do with the onset of gum disease. Instead, it is clearly a matter of just not doing a good enough job when it comes to maintaining oral health. Warning Signs Gum disease doesn’t always have obvious signs, but there are some things you can watch for: Do you experience bleeding gums when you floss or brush your teeth? Are your gums extremely sensitive? This can be especially obvious if a dental hygienist is cleaning your teeth. Are your gums puffy? Do you see any sign that your gums are receding from your teeth? Do you suffer from persistent bad breath, even though you brush your tongue, brush your teeth, floss, and use mouthwash? Protecting Your Dental Health What can you do to safeguard your health from this potentially life-altering disease? Here are a few effective places to start Visit the dentist regularly. By going in twice a year to have your teeth professionally cleaned and to let the dentist check for cavities and gingivitis, you are also giving the dental staff a chance to evaluate your oral health. Talk with them about warning signs and concerns you may have. If you do have a case of gingivitis, they can help you get the problem cleared up as quickly as possible. If your case has progressed to periodontal disease, they can probably help you find a good periodontist who can then give you any necessary additional help. Keep your mouth clean. In particular, brush your teeth promptly after you eat sugar or starch, and limit the amount that you eat. The bacteria that causes gum disease loves sugar and starch, too. Brushing your teeth promptly at least two or three times every day with a soft toothbrush and a good fluoride toothpaste is an important way to prevent the bacteria from getting out

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