The newsLINK Group - The Tooth, the Whole Tooth, and Nothing but the Tooth...

Editorial Library Category: General Business | Dental | Pediatric Dentistry Topics: Origins of the Tooth Fairy Title: The Tooth, the Whole Tooth, and Nothing but the Tooth… Author: newsLINK Staff Synopsis: As the story goes, the tooth fairy comes when a child has lost a tooth. She is commonly described as being very small, and she comes in the middle of the night. Editorial: The Tooth, the Whole Tooth, and Nothing but the Tooth… 4064 South Highland Drive, Millcreek, Utah 84124 │ thenewslinkgroup.com │ (v) 801.676.9722 │ (tf) 855.747.4003 │ (f) 801.742.5803 Editorial Library | © The newsLINK Group LLC 1 As the story goes, the tooth fairy comes when a child has lost a tooth. She is commonly described as being very small, and she comes in the middle of the night. The child is to leave the tooth under the pillow so that the tooth fairy can take it during her visit. Once she has taken the tooth, she leaves money under the pillow (a parent actually takes care of the switch). The teeth are then taken to her tower, and used for her purposes. So, where did this story come from — and more importantly, what really happens to all those teeth? The tooth fairy has appeared in folk tales throughout the western world, and parts of South Africa, since the 18 th century. Most tooth fairy experts (yes, they really do exist) agree that it is likely that the modern version of the fairy stems from a much-loved French story about a tooth- gathering mouse that turns itself into a fairy. For history buffs, however, the tooth fairy has its roots with the Vikings in 900 AD. Apparently, the Vikings had a “tooth fee” — a monetary gift for children in exchange for their teeth; which were later used in jewelry or amulets. The Vikings were a superstitious bunch and held a widespread belief that having an article of clothing, a piece of hair or a tooth belonging to your child in your possession brought power and luck in battle. The tooth fairy has no religious significance and no holiday affiliation, so it can readily be accepted by everyone. However, perhaps like the Vikings, parents for generations have found a certain charm in the tooth fairy and the attention she brings to the rites of passage for children as they grow — losing their baby teeth for their permanent, grownup ones. In modern times, the fashion for necklaces made with teeth has diminished and the general consensus is that the tooth fairy simply collects the teeth, labels them and neatly files them away in a museum-like castle. The tooth fairy has kept up with the times when it comes to her commercial transactions. Rosemary Wells, who is acknowledged as the world’s leading authority on the tooth fairy, actually tracked the exchange rate for teeth, from 1900 to 1980, against the consumer price index. She found that the tooth fairy has kept pace with inflation. The going rate for a tooth these days? According to Securian Dental Plans, it is $2.00 per tooth. Sources: Word Count: 441 Copyscape Clear Date: 12.15.2014 For a charming movie… Check out the 1997 Disney movie Toothless, with Kirsty Alley as a grumpy dentist turned tooth fairy.

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