The newsLINK Group - Phasing Out Sippy Cups

Editorial Library Category: General Business | Dental | Pediatric Dentistry Topics: Sippy Cups Title: Phasing Out Sippy Cups Author: newsLINK Staff Synopsis: Sugary drinks in sippy cups put your children at risk for cavities, and they are similar to thumbs or pacifiers because, if you allow your child to use them for an extended period of time, they can also affect your child’s development when it comes to talking. Editorial: Phasing Out Sippy Cups 4064 South Highland Drive, Millcreek, Utah 84124 │ thenewslinkgroup.com │ (v) 801.676.9722 │ (tf) 855.747.4003 │ (f) 801.742.5803 Editorial Library | © The newsLINK Group LLC 1 Problems with Sippy Cups Sugary drinks in sippy cups put your children at risk for cavities, and they are similar to thumbs or pacifiers because, if you allow your child to use them for an extended period of time, they can also affect your child’s development when it comes to talking. When children put their tongues behind their teeth before they swallow — something called a tongue thrust or a reverse swallow — they might end up needing speech therapy. Sippy Cup Guidelines No one is saying your children should never use sippy cups, just that you should be clear about their role. In particular, the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) has some guidelines about sippy cups for parents. Think of the sippy cup as a temporary way to transition children from nursing or a bottle to using a cup. Don’t use it the same way you would use a bottle or a pacifier, and don’t let it become a permanent part of your household routines. Fill the sippy cup with water except when you are feeding your child a meal. Even if you dilute something like fruit juice with water and put it in a bottle or a sippy cup, your children are more likely to develop cavities. You want to teach your children to drink plenty of water, and this is the place to start. Avoid using sippy cups when your child is taking a nap or going to bed. You don’t want to encourage your child to depend on a sippy cup in order to get to sleep. If you think you have to use a sippy cup, only put water in it. How to Move On Once you’ve decided it’s time to start helping your child move away from using a sippy cup, there are ways to ease the transition. Be patient and loving, of course, but also use the following tips: Keep the sippy cup on the table instead of allowing a toddler to carry it around the house. Be empathetic but matter-of-fact: “Yes, you like carrying the sippy cup, but it likes being on the table. Put it back on the table now, please.” If you’ve been putting juice in the sippy cup, start diluting the juice with water and then transition to only putting water in the cup. A toddler who likes juice in the sippy cup may lose interest if the only sippy cup option is water. If your child is two or more, you can prepare for the coming loss. Tell your child that it will soon be time to stop using the sippy cup and start drinking from a regular cup. (You could even have a day-by-day countdown.) Talk about getting a new cup, and help the child decide what the new cup will be. You want the emphasis to be on gaining new skills, along with an exciting new personal possession, and not on losing the sippy cup. When you do finally introduce the new cup, only put a small amount of liquid in at a time. It’ll be easier to clean up the inevitable spills. Sources: Article from Sophie about sippy cups “Ceasing the Sippy Cup,” by Renee Roberson, no date, http://www.toddlerstoday.com/articles/toddler- nutrition/ceasing-the-sippy-cup-4547/ Word Count: 523 Copyscape Clear Date: 12.15.2014

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