The newsLINK Group - Nutrition 101 for Healthy Teeth

Editorial Library Category: General Business | Dental | General Dentistry Topics: Dental, Teeth Health Title: Nutrition 101 for Healthy Teeth Author: newsLINK Staff Synopsis: It shouldn’t surprise anyone to find out that what a child eats during childhood affects the development of that child’s teeth. Not only that, but if a child or an adult eats badly and also develops periodontal disease or other infectious diseases involving the mouth, that person’s poor eating habits will make the periodontal disease worse than it would have been otherwise. Editorial: Nutrition 101 for Healthy Teeth 4064 South Highland Drive, Millcreek, Utah 84124 │ thenewslinkgroup.com │ (v) 801.676.9722 │ (tf) 855.747.4003 │ (f) 801.742.5803 Editorial Library | © The newsLINK Group LLC 1 It shouldn’t surprise anyone to find out that what a child eats during childhood affects the development of that child’s teeth. Not only that, but if a child or an adult eats badly and also develops periodontal disease or other infectious diseases involving the mouth, that person’s poor eating habits will make the periodontal disease worse than it would have been otherwise. Making poor food choices doesn’t directly cause gum disease, but researchers have concluded that it does speed up progress of the disease, and it also makes the disease more severe. What does that translate into? For one thing, periodontal disease is one of the main reasons an adult might lose teeth. Poor health, combined with fewer teeth, can make someone feel old far too early. It also will permanently hurt anyone’s quality of life. That’s not what you want for yourself, and it certainly isn’t what you want for your children. You and your family need to get the right amount of carbohydrates, protein, vitamins, minerals, and healthy fats so that normal tissues can grow, be maintained, and be repaired when necessary. A side benefit is that the body can fight off infections more effectively. For example, vitamin A can help you when you are injured or sick by reducing the amount of inflammatory tissue. You also need vitamins C, E, B, K, and D. They all contribute to a quicker healing process. Your body also needs the following minerals and nutrients in order to be healthy: Calcium Bones, such as your jaw bone, mostly consist of calcium. The same is true of your teeth. If you don’t have enough calcium, everybody knows you can develop osteoporosis. But you can also develop tooth decay and gum disease. You can find calcium in many foods and drinks. Milk and dairy products are well-publicized, but you can also find calcium in foods such as oysters, nuts, beans, and broccoli. Vitamin D It isn’t enough to eat calcium; you need to eat vitamin D so that your body can absorb the calcium. Too little vitamin D and you might develop burning mouth syndrome; some of the symptoms are a dry mouth and a bitter taste in your mouth, along with a burning sensation in the mouth. Getting out in the sun can help your body produce vitamin D, but most people don’t get enough that way. One way to supplement is to drink milk and eat fish and egg yolks. Iron If you don’t eat enough iron, your tongue can become inflamed and you can also get mouth sores. Eating red meat, bran cereals, and (surprisingly) some nuts and spices can help you make up the deficiency. Vitamin B3 (Niacin) Too little B3 causes canker sores and bad breath. One remedy is to eat more chicken and fish, which contain B3. Vitamins B12 and B2 (Riboflavin) Too little B2 and B12 can cause mouth sores. For B2, eat almonds, spinach, pasta, and bagels. For B12, eat protein (red meat, chicken, pork, fish, and liver) and dairy (milk, cheese, and yogurt). Vitamin C Too little vitamin C can make your gums bleed and loosen your teeth. Eat raw red peppers, oranges, and sweet potatoes. Sources: “The e ffect of diet and nutrition on oral health,” by Nayda Rondon, no date, article emailed to me by Sophie Word Count: 532 Copyscape Clear Date: 12.15.2014

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