The newsLINK Group - Foods and Drinks that Hurt Your Teeth

Editorial Library Category: General Business | Dental | General Dentistry Topics: Dental, Teeth Health Title: Foods and Drinks that Hurt Your Teeth Author: newsLINK Staff Synopsis: When you eat and how frequently you eat some specific foods and beverages can affect your overall health and also the health of your gums and teeth. Eating slowly may be good for your digestion, but it isn’t so good for your teeth. Editorial: Foods and Drinks that Hurt Your Teeth 4064 South Highland Drive, Millcreek, Utah 84124 │ thenewslinkgroup.com │ (v) 801.676.9722 │ (tf) 855.747.4003 │ (f) 801.742.5803 Editorial Library | © The newsLINK Group LLC 1 When you eat and how frequently you eat some specific foods and beverages can affect your overall health and also the health of your gums and teeth. Eating slowly may be good for your digestion, but it isn’t so good for your teeth. If you eat frequently and slowly, so that foods are in your mouth for long periods of time, your teeth are more subject to potential damage than they would otherwise be. If you and your children want to be healthy, it is essential that you all eat the right foods. Some foods are more likely to cause health problems for you (and your teeth) than others are. Therefore, it’s a good idea to eat some foods in moderation, and to choose not to eat other foods at all. As a general rule, two things in particular are a threat to your teeth: sugars and acids. Bacteria thrive on sugar, and their byproduct is acid. Acid destroys your tooth enamel. The following list consists of foods that are bad for your teeth because they contain sugar, acid, or both: Refined Carbohydrates Your body needs carbohydrates, but refined carbohydrates can be as bad for your teeth as candy. Leftover food particles in your mouth can be a feast for bacteria. Be careful about how much you eat when it comes to all kinds of chips, breads, pasta, or crackers. Sticky, Chewy Foods Foods that stick to your teeth are harder to get off. Saliva washes away some of the sugar you eat, but sticky sugar does just what the name implies: it sticks. Raisins, jelly beans, granola bars, honey, caramel, and syrup can all lead to tooth decay. Sugary Treats Remember that if a dessert has a lot of sugar in it (and what really good dessert doesn’t?), then it isn’t going to be good for your teeth because the bacteria in your mouth enjoy sugar as much as you do. Candy and Gum with Sugar When you chew gum or eat candy, and the gum or candy has sugar in it, you are coating your teeth with that sugar. Worse than that, people tend to chew gum and enjoy hard candy for a long time, so not only are your teeth are exposed to that sugar, they are exposed for a long time. Acidic Foods Citric and malic acids are found in lemons and fruit products. Also, beware of lactic acid, which is in yogurt, and tartaric acid, which is in grapes and wines. Carbonated Drinks Regular soda pop has a huge amount of sugar in it. You are essentially drinking sugar water with some other ingredients added to it, and the result isn’t low calorie. Don’t think you are solving the problem if you switch to diet soda instead: regular and diet sodas are acidic because of the phosphorous and carbonation in them. Fruit and Vegetable Juice You’d be better off eating the fruit or vegetable than you are drinking them in juice form. There’s more fiber (so you feel fuller), and fruit and vegetable juices usually have a lot of sugar in them, too, so your tooth enamel is under attack yet again. Sports Drinks Like carbonated drinks, most sports drinks are acidic. Sources: “The effect of diet and nutrition on oral health,” by Nayda Rondon, no date, article emailed to me by Sophie Word Count: 538 Copyscape Clear Date: 12.15.2014

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