The newsLINK Group - Dental Emergencies Waiting to Happen

Editorial Library Category: General Business | Dental | General Dentistry Topics: Dental, Dental Emergencies Title: Dental Emergencies – Waiting to Happen Author: newsLINK Staff Synopsis: As the spring season starts up, most doctors and dentists (including us!) marvel at the fact that after attending years of university training, they have learned what most mothers know by simply looking at their child’s eyes, peering into sore throats, and gently feeling swollen ankles. Editorial: Dental Emergencies – Waiting to Happen 4064 South Highland Drive, Millcreek, Utah 84124 │ thenewslinkgroup.com │ (v) 801.676.9722 │ (tf) 855.747.4003 │ (f) 801.742.5803 Editorial Library | © The newsLINK Group LLC 1 As the spring season starts up, most doctors and dentists (including us!) marvel at the fact that after attending years of university training, they have learned what most mothers know by simply looking at their child’s eyes, peering into sore throats, and gently feeling swollen ankles. So, to support all the Dr. Moms in our practice, here are a few instructions. We call them The Blanco Dental Emergency Primer: Toothache Thoroughly clean the area of the affected tooth. Rinse the mouth vigorously with warm water or use dental floss to dislodge impacted food or debris. If the pain is still there, contact our office. DO NOT place aspirin on the gum or on the aching tooth. If the face is swollen, apply cold compresses and contact our office immediately. Cut or Bitten Tongue, Lip, or Cheek Apply ice to bruised areas. If there is bleeding, apply firm but gentle pressure with a gauze or cloth. If bleeding does not stop after 15 minutes, or if it cannot be controlled by simple pressure, take your child to the hospital emergency room. Knocked-Out Permanent Tooth Find the tooth first. When you pick it up, hold it by the crown instead of the root. You may rinse the tooth but DO NOT clean or handle the tooth unnecessarily. Inspect the tooth for fractures. If it is sound, try to reinsert it in the socket. Have the patient hold the tooth in place by biting on gauze. If you cannot reinsert the tooth, either transport the tooth in a cup containing the patient’s saliva or milk, or (if the patient is old enough) have the patient carry the knocked-out tooth inside the mouth. The patient must see a dentist IMMEDIATELY! Time is a critical factor in saving the tooth. Keep Our Office Contact Information Handy When in doubt; find out. Call us. Emergency dental care is actually a specialty of ours – so keep our name, phone, and address handy in your car and at home. Make sure that your child’s school records are up-to-date with our office contact information as well. Our contact information is: David P. Blanco, DDS (801.969.1802). Sources: Word Count: 362 Copyscape Clear Date: 12.15.2014

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