The newsLINK Group - Moviemaking in Ogden

Editorial Library Category: Cities & Towns Topics: Moviemaking Title: Moviemaking in Ogden Author: newsLINK Staff Synopsis: If you were to pick a city in Utah with a history of appearing in movies, television episodes, series, and mini-series productions, you probably wouldn’t pick Ogden. However, that’s exactly the city you should pick. Editorial: Moviemaking in Ogden 4064 South Highland Drive, Millcreek, Utah 84124 │ thenewslinkgroup.com │ (v) 801.676.9722 │ (tf) 855.747.4003 │ (f) 801.742.5803 Editorial Library | © The newsLINK Group LLC 1 If you were to pick a city in Utah with a history of appearing in movies, television episodes, series, and mini-series productions, you probably wouldn’t pick Ogden. However, that’s exactly the city you should pick. Ogden’s connection to the movie and television industry actually may have started with a man you’ve probably never head of: William W. Hodkinson. You’ve almost certainly heard of his company, however: it’s today’s Paramount Pictures. Mr. Hodkinson chose a new name for his company, Paramount Pictures, and made the change official on May 8, 1914. The new company name meant he needed a new logo, so during a meeting in 1914, he grabbed a napkin and drew the image of a mountain that looks like a tall, snow-covered version of Ben Lomond Peak (other sources claim he drew it on a pad of blotting paper instead). After Mr. Hodkinson’s death in 1971, the entertainment industry began to rediscover Ogden’s potential for more than just providing a skyline. Hollywood sleight-of-hand turned the Mountain View Motel (now apartments) on 24 th Street into the exterior for the Provo motel where Chevy Chase stayed in Universal’s 1985 hit, Fletch . The striking art-deco architecture of Ogden High School formed the entire backdrop for the 1987 Universal Pictures nerd/bully teen film, Three O’Clock High . Many local high school students were used as extras during production and several even contributed to the set design by making the posters and banners that hang in the hallways. One of the most quoted movie lines among Generation X-ers and Millennials, “You’re KILLIN’ ME, Smalls!!” comes from the Twentieth Century Fox 1993 classic, The Sandlot . The memorable scene where Squints fakes his drowning to set up mouth-to-mouth resuscitation so he can kiss his dream girl, Wendy, was filmed at the Lorin Farr Swimming Pool. The 1994 Stephen King mini-series, The Stand , was filmed in downtown Ogden and much of the surrounding area. The resulting six episodes told the story of a deadly plague wiping out most of the world’s population in a post-apocalyptic world. In 1997, Ogden’s airport was a key location for Touchstone’s star-studded summer blockbuster Con Air , starring Nicholas Cage, John Cusack, John Malkovich, and Steve Buscemi. Throughout four seasons of production between 2002 and 2006, Ogden’s historic 25 th Street served as the main drag of a fictional Colorado town for the Warner Brothers series, Everwood . Local business owners accommodated the production by altering business hours, allowing temporary alterations to their facades and signs, and working as extras. Writer/director Ami Canaan Mann chose Ogden as the setting for the 2014 independent production of Jackie & Ryan , starring Katherine Heigl and Ben Barnes. It’s one of the few times Ogden has been called by its name on film, but Mann only made the decision to use the city’s name after production had already started. What was behind her decision? She wanted to use shots of some iconic Ogden landmarks, but she also admired the city and wanted to give it some recognition. ABC Studios has designated Ogden and much of Weber County as the primary location for a new series premiering this fall: Oil . The series follows a young couple named Billy (Chace Crawford) and Cody (Rebecca Rittenhouse). When the biggest oil rush in U.S. history begins in North Dakota. Billy and Cody decide to head to the oil fields because they want to get rich. Their lives soon get involved with an ensemble group of interesting characters that includes a powerful oil tycoon played by Don Johnson. Ogden particularly enjoys being home to television series because of their long-term impact on the city. For example, Everwood gave Ogden a short-term economic boost because

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