Charter Focus - Fall 2013 - page 6

6
Colorado League of Charter Schools
Top Products/Practices
That Impact Energy
In the next three years, the highest percentage of higher
education respondents and second highest percent-
age of K–12 will use energy ef cient lighting on their
green projects.
The high rate of return for lighting instal-
lation has made it consistently one of the products
most frequently used for green projects, a conclusion
supported by other McGraw-Hill Construction studies
of this and other sectors, most recently in
A Path to
Achieving Higher Building Performance
(available at
analyticssstore.construction.com).
Many other products that save energy also will be
widely used, including occupancy sensors, lighting
controls and properly sized HVAC. The strong use of
building automation systems and on-site renewable
energy, which require larger investments, demonstrates
their commitment to energy savings.
Products/Practices That Impact
Indoor Environmental Quality
Despite the greater emphasis on health and well-being
and indoor environmental quality (IEQ) in the K–12
sector compared with higher education suggested in the
‡ndings, the percentage of higher education respondents
planning to use the following products that impact IEQ is
higher than the percentage of K–12 respondents:
• Non-Toxic Materials: 64% in higher education versus
55% in K–12
• Air Filtration Beyond Standard Practice: 44% in higher
education versus 38% in K–12
This may be due to higher levels of LEED certi‡cation
in higher education (see page 55 for more information).
However, the differential is less than in the last three
years, suggesting that the concern over health and well-
being in K–12 is impacting product choice.
Other Green Products/Practices
An interesting pattern emerges among many of the
remaining green products and practices. Those that have
been in wide use (by 60% of respondents or more) typi-
cally will remain at a high level, although use drops a little
due to high market penetration. This includes water-ef‡-
cient ‡xtures, daylighting and cool roofs.
On the other hand, products used by less than half of
last three years are expected to
grow. For K–12, highest growth is expected in green roofs
Green Building Products and Practices
CONTINUED
and prefabricated components. In higher education,
highest growth is expected in school gardens and rainwa-
ter collection. Architects and c ntractors report increases
in all four of these products/practices.
Use of Green Products/Practices
on Education Projects
Top Green Products and Practices that
Impact Energy Use in the Next ThreeYears
Source: McGraw-Hill Construction, 2013
K–12
Contractor
Architect
Higher Education
90%
76%
78%
67%
Energy Ef ciency Lighting
Occupancy Sensors
Lighting Controls
Building Automation Systems
Properly Sized HVAC
On-Site Renewable Energy
93%
74%
73%
63%
93%
68%
70%
64%
82%
68%
65%
68%
90%
68%
68%
64%
58%
61%
38%
59%
USE OF GREEN
PRODUCTS/ PRACTICES
ON EDUCATION PROJECTS
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Top Products/
Practices That
Impact Energy
In the next three years, the highest
percentage of higher education
respondents and second highest
percentage of K–12 will use energy
efficient lighting on their green
projects. The high rate of return
for lighting installation has made
it consistently one of the products
most frequently used for green
projects, a conclusion supported by
other McGraw-Hill Construction
studies of this and other sectors,
most recently in A Path to Achieving
Higher Building Performance (available
at analyticssstore.construction.
com). Many other products that
save energy also will be widely used,
including occupancy sensors, lighting
controls and properly sized HVAC.
The strong use of building automation
systems and on-site renewable energy,
which require larger investments,
demonstrates their commitment to
energy savings.
Products/Pr ctices
That Impact Indoor
Environmental
Quality
Despite the greater emphasis on health
and well-being and indoor enviro -
mental quality (IEQ) in the K–12 secto
compared with higher education sug-
gested in the findi gs, the p rcentage of
higher education respondents planning
to use the following products that im-
pact IEQ is higher than the percentage
of K–12 respond nts:
Non-Toxic Materials: 64% in
higher educa io versus 55%
in K–12
Air Filtration Bey nd S andard
Practic : 44% in higher
education versus 38% in K–12
This may be due to higher levels of
LEED ertification in higher education.
However, the differential is less than in
the last three years, suggesting that the
concern over health and wellb ing in
K–12 is impacting product choice.
Other Green
Products/Practices
An interesting patter emerges among
many of the remain g green products
and practices. Those that hav bee in
wide use (by 60% of respondents or
more) typically will remain at a high
level, although use drops a little due to
high market penetration. This includes
water-efficient fixtures, daylighting
and cool roofs.
On the other hand, products used by
less than half of the respondents in the
last three years are expected to grow.
For K–12, highest growth is expected
in green roofs and prefabricated
components. In higher education,
highest growth is expected in school
gardens and rainwater collection.
Architects and contractors report
increases in all four of these products/
practices.
Top Green Products and Practices that
Impact Energy Use in the Next Three Years
1,2,3,4,5 7,8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15,16,...24
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